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Posts Tagged ‘Iraq’

This is the top censored story of 2009. The deaths will continue for years to come as people—including American veterans—are sickened by depleted uranium and produce children with birth defects. The maimed veterans will be tossed aside and abused by their own government, and a disproportionate number will become homeless. And to think that it was all based on a lie.

Over one million Iraqis have met violent deaths as a result of the 2003 invasion, according to a study conducted by the prestigious British polling group, Opinion Research Business (ORB). These numbers suggest that the invasion and occupation of Iraq rivals the mass killings of the last century—the human toll exceeds the 800,000 to 900,000 believed killed in the Rwandan genocide in 1994, and is approaching the number (1.7 million) who died in Cambodia’s infamous “Killing Fields” during the Khmer Rouge era of the 1970s.

ORB’s research covered fifteen of Iraq’s eighteen provinces. Those not covered include two of Iraq’s more volatile regions—Kerbala and Anbar—and the northern province of Arbil, where local authorities refused them a permit to work. In face-to-face interviews with 2,414 adults, the poll found that more than one in five respondents had had at least one death in their household as a result of the conflict, as opposed to natural cause.

Read more at Project Censored.

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The corporate press in the U.S. simply doesn’t care that the Iraqi fatality rate borders on genocide. The neocons and fake conservatives will say that the U.S. probably should have killed more.

“Among the most important corporate media censored news stories of the past decade, one must be that over one million people have died because of the United States military invasion and occupation of Iraq.  This, of course, does not include the number of deaths from the first Gulf War nor the ensuing sanctions placed upon the country of Iraq that, combined, caused close to an additional one million Iraqi deaths. In the Iraq War, which began in March of 2003, over a million people have died violently primarily from US bombings and neighborhood patrols.  These were deaths in excess of the normal civilian death rate under the prior government.  Among US military leaders and policy elites, the issue of counting the dead was dismissed before the Iraqi invasion even began.  In an interview with reporters in late March of 2002 US General Tommy Franks stated, “You know we don’t do body counts.” Fortunately, for those concerned about humanitarian costs of war and empire, others do.”

Read more at Truthout.org.

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